Occupational Therapy -> Augmentative and Alternative Communication

Augmentative and Alternative Communication

AAC is an alternative way for an individual to communicate when there are difficulties with speech or writing. Occupational therapists (OTs) focus on assisting an individual communicate his or her wants and needs. OTs often collaborate with a speech and language pathologist to find effective AAC methods. An OT may assist in assessing an individual’s visual, perceptual, motor and cognitive skills in order to increase participation and independence with the AAC method.

Minor focus areas

Reference links

  • Nurturing Care For Early Childhood Development 1 Author: World Health Organization - Your loving care as a parent is what a child needs to be healthy, wellnourished and safe. • Communicate early and often, starting even before your baby is born. It will help you build a warm and loving relationship. • Make time to play with your child and engage them in your daily chores. You will help your child to learn, be happy and thrive. • Remember that feeding times are periods of learning and love – talk to your child while feeding and make eye-to-eye contact. • If you feel sad and unable to respond joyfully to your child, seek help from your health care provider
  • Nurturing Care For Early Childhood Development 1 Author: World Health Organization - Your loving care as a parent is what a child needs to be healthy, wellnourished and safe. • Communicate early and often, starting even before your baby is born. It will help you build a warm and loving relationship. • Make time to play with your child and engage them in your daily chores. You will help your child to learn, be happy and thrive. • Remember that feeding times are periods of learning and love – talk to your child while feeding and make eye to eye contact. • If you feel sad and unable to respond joyfully to your child, seek help from your health care provider.
  • Variables Related to Successful School-Based Practice 1 Author: Case-Smith, Jane.  - Three themes were identified: "Finding the key" described a procedural reasoning process in which the participants searched for the underlying reasons for each student's behaviors and performance. "The whole child" emphasized the importance of the student's psychosocial core and described the therapist's use of interactive and conditional reasoning to form supportive relationships with their students. Because each participant valued the student's vision of a new self, she was able to help the student achieve new social roles and improved self-esteem. "Whose success is this?" told of the importance of a cohesive team, which included the parents, to the child's success. The child's achievement of important life goals and success as a student seemed to be the result of a team effort to which occupational therapy contributed.