Speech Therapy -> Expressive Language -> Basic Concepts

Basic Concepts

Words that a child needs to understand in order to perform everyday tasks like following directions, participating in classroom routines, and engaging in conversation.

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Goal Bank

  • During a 4 month therapy period, Portia will use the following morphological markers, first through imitation, then spontaneously: possessive -s, auxiliary verbs, plural –s, present progressive –ing, “wh” questions (who, what, where), and negation (no, not) with 80% accuracy over 4 consecutive sessions to improve overall expressive and receptive language skills.
  • Ricki will orally label age-appropriate vocabulary words presented in objects and pictures, such as nouns and actions/verbs, and will use these target words accurately in a syllable or syllablewith 90% accuracy across 3 therapy sessions, in order to expand expressive vocabulary skills to an age appropriate level.
  • Given objects, pictures, or visual stimuli, Zita will receptively and expressively identify age-appropriate vocabulary words, actions, and concepts, and sort them into categories with 90% accuracy across 3 consecutive sessions to increase receptive and expressive language skills.
  • Bruce will understand and use age-appropriate morphological and syntactic markers including but not limited to pronouns, prepositions, comparatives/superlatives, and word-ordering, first through imitation, then spontaneously in words, words, and word, with 90% accuracy across 3 consecutive sessions to improve language comprehension and expression.
  • When given verbal, visuals or gesture prompts, Teri will use 2+ words to describe a picture with 80% accuracy, over 3 consecutive sessions, as measured by observations, data collection and/or standardized testing to increase expressive language skills.

Reference links

  • What Are Basic Concepts? Author: Super Duper - Basic concepts are the foundation of a child’s education. They are words that a child needs to understand in order to perform everyday tasks like following directions, participating in classroom routines, and engaging in conversation. A child needs to know basic concepts in order to be successful in reading, writing, and math. In fact, knowledge of basic concepts directly relates to a child’s performance in school.