Speech Therapy -> Expressive Language -> Vocabulary

Vocabulary

Vocabulary is the building block of language. A child's vocabulary knowledge relates to their reading comprehension.

Reference links

  • Reading: A Review of the Current Research On Vocabulary Instruction 0
    www2.ed.gov
    Author: National Reading Technical Assistance Center, RMC Research Corporation - This review of current vocabulary research confirms the benefits of explicit teaching over implicit teaching in promoting vocabulary development. Results from this review suggest that effective and efficient research-based methods are available when selecting a particular instructional approach. The findings also suggest several instructional implications for promoting word knowledge: • Frequent exposure to targeted vocabulary words. Biemiller and Boote (2006) found that repeated Reading a storybook resulted in more significant average gains in word knowledge for young children. • Explicit instruction of targeted vocabulary words. Biemiller and Boote (2006) also found that word explanations taught directly during the reading of a storybook enhanced children’s understanding of word meanings. In addition, Nash and Snowling (2006) found that using a contextual approach to instruction produced more significant vocabulary gains than lessons that emphasized learning word definitions. • Questioning and language engagement. Scaffolding questions that are, moving from low-demand questions to high-demand questions promote greater gains in word learning (Blewitt, Rump, Shealy, & Cook, 2009). Vocabulary instruction should include teacher-student and interactive activities that target new words (Coyne, McCoach & Kapp, 2007). In summary, active vocabulary instruction should permeate a classroom and contain rich and exciting information. In addition, vocabulary instruction should cover many words that have been skillfully and carefully chosen to reduce vocabulary gaps and improve students’ abilities to apply word knowledge to the task of comprehension.
  • Building Semantic Networks: The Impact of a Vocabulary Intervention On Preschoolers’ Depth of Word Knowledge 2
    ila.onlinelibrary.wiley.com
    Author: Elizabeth B. Hadley, David K. Dickinson, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff - Results suggest that fostering deep vocabulary knowledge involves not only teaching single word entities but also introducing systems of conceptually related words to build semantic networks.

Activity List(s)

Visual Schedule Cards

Goal Bank

Top 20 (View all)

  • Dortha will identify and/or name functions of familiar objects with fading prompts to improve vocabulary skills with 90% accuracy over 5 consecutive sessions. 3
  • Given objects, pictures, or visual stimuli, Zita will receptively and expressively identify age-appropriate vocabulary words, actions, and concepts, and sort them into categories with 90% accuracy across 3 consecutive sessions to increase receptive and expressive language skills. 3
  • Chong will use three-word phonemes inclusive of pronouns: I, me, my, you in 3/4 opportunities across three therapy sessions when given moderate, multi-modality cues to demonstrate understanding of appropriate grammar. 3
  • Ricki will orally label age-appropriate vocabulary words presented in objects and pictures, such as nouns and actions/verbs, and will use these target words accurately in a phrase or sentence with 90% accuracy across 3 therapy sessions, to expand expressive vocabulary skills to an age-appropriate level. 3
  • Illa will imitate, then use, words to request assistance (help, open) 3 times during a session over 3 consecutive sessions as measured by clinician data and observation to increase expressive language abilities. 2
  • Leon will state how 4 things go together with fading prompts with 90% accuracy over 4 consecutive sessions to improve receptive and expressive language skills. 2
  • Given pictures, Gisela will name family members with 90% accuracy for 4 out of 4 sessions as measured by clinician observation to increase expressive language skills. 2
  • Omar will demonstrate improved expressive language vocabulary in and out of the therapy setting by naming 6 items in a category, (for example sports, holidays, months, items that are round, large, cold, used to clean, at school, etc) with 90% accuracy in 3 out of 5 opportunities over 5 sessions, with fading prompts as measured by SLP observation and data. 3
  • Carlton will request an object/activity/basic need (e.g. take a break) given visual supports (e.g. field of 3-4 picture symbols) in 80% of opportunities, adjusting level of support as needed across consecutive therapy sessions as measured by clinician data and observation to increase expressive language skills. 1
  • Rogelio will answer basic questions (including, but not limited to, personal information and/or classroom themes/academic topics) using contextually relevant information/facts with 80% accuracy across 3 consecutive therapy sessions as measured by clinician data and observation to increase expressive language skills. 2
  • Carson will use age appropriate vocabulary phoneme to talk about her environment (i.e. I see__. I hear___. I feel___.) in 3 /4 trials over 4 consecutive therapy sessions to increase utterance length and complexity as measured by clinician data and observation. 2
  • Whitney will develop and expand imitation skills, moving from imitation of motor patterns to imitation of vocal patterns and speech sounds with 90% accuracy across 3 sessions as measured by clinician data and observation to increase overall expressive language skills and speech intelligibility. 2
  • Sheena will provide 4 attributes of an object/picture/vocabulary target with minimal visual/semantic cues with 90% accuracy across 4 consecutive sessions as measured by clinician data collection to improve overall expressive and receptive language skills. 2
  • Dannie will demonstrate understanding of simple analogies by pointing to pictures that complete the analogy in 3 out of 4 trials with 90% accuracy in 3 consecutive sessions to increase receptive and expressive language skills. 2
  • Given an object, picture, or story, Faustina will say a complete phoneme using superlatives (i.e., “That is the best cookie.”) with 90% accuracy in 3 out of 4 opportunities over 4 therapy sessions to demonstrate grammar, syntax, and vocabulary skills. 3
  • Edwin will label 4 action verbs during a session with minimal cues across 4 consecutive sessions with 80% accuracy to increase expressive language skills, as measured by clinician observation. 2
  • Norris will increase his/her expressive vocabulary by labeling 80% of targeted nouns, verbs, and modifiers across 3 sessions as measured by clinician observation. 3
  • Madaline will listen to 4-6 phoneme paragraphs, identify key components, answer "wh" questions requiring recall of details and understanding of concepts presented, and retell the narrative, retaining critical information with 90% accuracy over 3 consecutive sessions as measured by SLP data and observation to increase narrative development and overall language skills. 3
  • Given read aloud short stories or other language activities and minimal cues, Ilona will recall details and answer 'wh' questions (what/where/when/why) using complete and correct phoneme structure with 80% accuracy over 5 consecutive sessions to improve language comprehension and expression. 3
  • During structured and unstructured activities, Florencia will use action words to verbalize basic wants & needs (e.g. stop, go, turn, want, eat) with 90% accuracy across 3 consecutive therapy sessions to increase expressive communication. 3

Resources

Top 20 (View all)