Speech Therapy -> Receptive Language -> Basic Concepts

Basic Concepts

Words that a child needs to understand in order to perform everyday tasks like following directions, participating in classroom routines, and engaging in conversation (i.e. up/down, in/out, big/small, around/between/next to). Receptive tasks related to basic concepts include placing items in given direction locations, identifying pictures of paired concepts, or performing other actions (i.e. turn lights OFF).

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Goal Bank - top 20 (View all)

  • Given decreasing cues, Bud will complete receptive language tasks (i.e. turn pages in a book, match colors/photos, follow commands with gesture cues) in 4 out of 4 trials across 4 therapy sessions to improve overall expressive and receptive language skills.
  • Hunter will receptively identify body parts on self and toys, using pointing and progressing to verbal labels with 80% accuracy over 3 consecutive sessions to improve language comprehension.
  • Katheleen will improve understanding of basic concepts by completing simple 1-2 step commands embedded with simple spatial concepts (in, on, out, off, under) and basic adjectives (e.g., big cat) given minimal verbal cues with 80% accuracy, across 3 consecutive sessions.
  • Demetria will receptively identify common objects, body parts, and pictures with fading prompts with 90% accuracy across 3 sessions to improve receptive language skills and vocabulary.
  • Given visual and verbal support, Kris will demonstrate understanding of basic concepts, including under/over, next to, big/small, front/back, tall/short/long, wet/dry with 80% accuracy as measured by data collection and observation across 3 consecutive data collection days to improve upon receptive language skills.
  • Fred will demonstrate receptive understanding of age-appropriate vocabulary words with fading prompts with 90% accuracy over 3 consecutive sessions to increase receptive language skills.
  • Trey will complete 5 out of 5 receptive language tasks without hand over hand assistance (i.e. attending to a book, completing a sound puzzle, sorting matching items, shape sorter, matching object to picture) across 5 consecutive sessions to demonstrate receptive language skills such as basic concepts, following directions, vocabulary, and/or categories.
  • Corrine will follow simple 5 part commands without gestural cues in 5 out of 5 trials across three sessions to demonstrate auditory comprehension and understanding of basic concepts.
  • Homer will demonstrate receptive understanding of age-appropriate vocabulary words, including a variety of nouns, verbs, and attributes ("big"), by pointing to the described item in a field of 2 in 3/5 opportunities across 5 sessions when given moderate multi-modality cues to increase understanding of vocabulary words.
  • Isreal will demonstrate improved receptive language skills in the therapeutic setting by following directions when presented with picture cues or objects to show understanding of spatial concepts (on, in, above, below/under, beside/next to, in front, behind, between) with 90% accuracy in 3 out of 5 opportunities over 5 sessions in which the activity is presented.
  • Freeman will follow 2-step commands containing "before/after" with fading prompts with 90% accuracy to improve understanding of basic concepts across 3 sessions.
  • Napoleon will demonstrate understanding of spatial concepts (i.e. under, behind, next to, in front of) in phonemes with 90% accuracy across 3 sessions as measured by clinician observation to increase basic concept skills.
  • Seymour will complete receptive language tasks (i.e. color matching, object matching, object/photo match, turning pages in a book) to improve understanding of language with % accuracy in 3 out of 4 trials without tactile assistance.
  • Hank will follow 4 step directions including a preposition and/or sequential term (I.e. first, second) with minimal cueing and 80% accuracy across 4 consecutive sessions to improve language comprehension.
  • Hector will follow two-step unrelated directions in a quiet listening environment in with 90% accuracy to improve receptive language skills in 3/4 opportunities across 4 therapy sessions when given minimal verbal and visual cues.
  • Given an emotion in a picture, video, or story, Jovita will demonstrate comprehension of non-verbal cues by listing at least 4 cues such as, facial expression nuances, tone of voice changes, body stance nuances, and/or gestural cues that were present for that given emotion with 90% accuracy across 4 sessions to improve language and pragmatic comprehension.
  • Nicholle will demonstrate understanding of age-appropriate vocabulary by following directions of increasing length and complexity including negation (not, without), sequencing (after, before), serial order (first, then, last), location (right, left) and/or temporal (until, at the same time) concepts, advancing to the next level when 90% accuracy is achieved over 3 consecutive sessions.
  • Micaela will receptively identify age-appropriate vocabulary items from a variety of semantic categories (i.e. letters, shapes, colors, nouns, verbs, adjectives, etc.) in a field of 4, with fading supports with 80% accuracy on 4 out of 4 consecutive therapy days as measured by clinician data and observation to increase receptive language skills.
  • Given objects, pictures, or visual stimuli, Zita will receptively and expressively identify age-appropriate vocabulary words, actions, and concepts, and sort them into categories with 90% accuracy across 3 consecutive sessions to increase receptive and expressive language skills.
  • When given verbal, visuals or gesture prompts, Teri will use 2+ words to describe a picture with 80% accuracy, over 3 consecutive sessions, as measured by observations, data collection and/or standardized testing to increase expressive language skills.

Visual Schedule Cards

Related Disorder(s)

  • Receptive Language Disorder - A child with receptive language disorder has difficulties with understanding what is said to them. The symptoms vary between children but, generally, problems with language comprehension begin before the age of three years. Children need to understand spoken language before they can use language to express themselves.

Reference links

  • What Are Basic Concepts? Author: Super Duper - Basic concepts are the foundation of a child’s education. They are words that a child needs to understand in order to perform everyday tasks like following directions, participating in classroom routines, and engaging in conversation. A child needs to know basic concepts in order to be successful in reading, writing, and math. In fact, knowledge of basic concepts directly relates to a child’s performance in school.